How to deal with bus lanes

If you see a bus lane then you will see a range of different attitudes from drivers. Mainly there will be frustration that they are stuck in a huge queue and there is a perfectly good lane that is empty apart from the occasional bus.

For some this provides an opportunity too good to miss as they cut into the bus lane then drive out of it again, saving themselves plenty of time in a queue - causing even more frustration for other drivers.

Sometimes you are allowed in a bus lane, and again the confusion here can lead to all sorts of chaos on the roads as some drivers know they can use it, others take a chance, others think they can and don't want to risk it, whilst others just steer clear of bus lanes at all times.

However there should be a plate at the beginning of a bus lane telling you the rules for that lane. Some operate 24 hours a day but many can be used outside of certain peak hours. For instance if there is a blue rectangular sign telling you Mon - Fri 7 - 11am then you can use it outside of those hours.

If you can't see any information relating to the bus lane then you have to assume that it operates all day long and therefore should aboic going into it.

Although many get confused by road signs remember the simple rules of road signs outlined in the other articles in this section and you will learn to see just how useful they are and how they can remove confusion from your driving experience and actually make it much more straightforward - road signs are there to assist and help you and offer information, not to confuse you!

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