What to expect at a hazard perception test

The test has fourteen different clips, as outlined in the article entitled 'how to pass the hazard perception test'.

Each of those clips starts counting down from ten to zero, in order to alert you that the clip is about to start, and that you should be ready to look at the screen to find the hazard as quickly as you can.

Because you click the mouse to tell the computer that you've identified a hazard, the computer feedbacks to you by means of a red flag appearing on the screen. There is one clip that contains two hazards, and this means that you are able to click more than once; this will mean that another flag appears and so there will be two flags when you think that there were two hazards to correspond to the two clicks that you make. Note that this gets cleared in between clips rather than building up, so each click will begin afresh without any red flags on the screen.

So, that is how the actual mechanism of the hazard perception test works - a series of clicks that you must click the mouse on at each time that you see a hazard. The best advice is to be sure that you are seeing a hazard rather than trying to guess too early. Whilst there are less marks if you are a little slower to find the hazard, it is much better to get a few marks for seeing the hazard when you are sure rather than guessing or coming in to early when something is not infact a hazard.

You should never try and second guess. Actually treating it like you really were driving and imagining what would stand out and grab your attention is a good way of doing it - when something grabs your attention the chances are that it is because it is either a potential or a developing hazard.

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