Driving theory test questions
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How Pass Plus Works

What does pass plus contain? Well, it has six different modules and each of these ones focuses on a different set of conditions in which you might have to drive. These are in and around the town, in all weathers, on rural roads, at night, on dual carriageways and finally on motorways.

The course lasts for a minimum of six hours. When you undertake the course you get something called a pass plus pupil's guide which tells you all about the course. It is a fully practical course with no theory element. There is no test at the end of it so you can relax on that score! However, the instructor will constantly assess how you are performing and there is a training report that you'll need to sign when you reach the standard in each module.

Once you have completed the course, you get sent a certificate and this should allow you to claim a discount on a car insurance policy.

If you have undertaken and passed pass plus, is there anything left? Well yes, there is the possibility of taking what is called an advanced driving test. This takes you to a higher level again when it comes to driving.

If you are interested in pass plus and would like more information, then there is a page on the DirectGov website that will outline this in more details:

http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Motoring/LearnerAndNewDrivers/NewlyQualifiedDrivers/DG_4022426

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Practice Theory Test Question

Do you know the answer to this randomly chosen driving theory test revision question?

It can help to plan your route before starting a journey. You can do this by contacting: A) your local filling station B) a motoring organisation C) the Driver Vehicle Licensing Agency D) your vehicle manufacturer

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