Driving theory test questions
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Theory test case studies

One of the relatively new elements added to the driving theory test is what is called the case study element. This was introduced on 28th September 2009, and there is one case study in the theory test from that date.

This element allows you to score a total of 5 marks. Along with the 45 multiple choice marks available, this means there are a total of 50 points available, and you must score 43/50 to pass this part of the theory test.

The idea of the case study is to assess your understanding of the theory of driving. The contrast with the multiple choice questions being that they are focused specifically on your knowledge of the theory.

The case study provides some information to you (such as a brief story or some sort of scenario) and you must then answer five questions. They will be answered through the computer as with the multiple choice part of the test. Typically there will be some multiple choice answers that appear after each of the five questions, and you will be told how many answers to mark.

The DSA has said that it may introduce additional case study questions into the theory test in the future.

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Where you see street lights but no speed limit signs the limit is usually: A) 30mph B) 40mph C) 50mph D) 60mph

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